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ORCID in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa- An Update

Fri, 13 Sep 2019 - 00:00 UTC

ORCID relies on our community to help us achieve our shared vision. As our members, you play a critical role, by creating connections and sharing information about research and researchers. Collectively  you are helping us make progress toward our shared goal where research information is entered once and reused often.

Membership

The EMEA (Europe, Middle East & Africa) region continues to lead the world in terms of ORCID adoption. Well over half of ORCID members are based here, and more than 70% have joined through a consortium. These communities of practice are key to our success, as they share our global, inclusive, and collaborative approach to building a better research information infrastructure. Working with consortia allows us to scale our efforts and may lead to improved collaboration and more effective ORCID implementation at a regional level. Five EMEA consortia were recognized for their contributions at our consortia workshop in May.

Consortia in Europe & Middle East and Africa

Austria | Belgium | Denmark | Finland | Germany | Greece | Israel |

Italy | Netherlands | Norway | Portugal | South Africa | Sweden | UK

So far in 2019 we have welcomed three consortia in Europe:

  • The Austrian Consortium led by TU Wien and University of Vienna was founded in January with 11 institutional members, followed by an official launch event in June
  • Denmark was the first country to establish an ORCID consortium in 2014, and after a one year break due to internal reorganization, the Danish Consortium re-launched in January, this time under the lead of Aalborg University Library 
  • In Greece a national consortium was established in January  with HEAL-Link (Hellenic Academic Libraries Link) as the lead organization. The consortium currently has 43 members, making it one of the largest in the region

We also recently welcomed our first members in Botswana, Nigeria, Turkey and Iraq, as well as new members in France, Germany, Ireland, Kenya, Poland, Qatar, Spain, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates, and United Kingdom, and are in active discussions with organizations across the region.

Adoption and Use

As of today, there are 562 ORCID members in Europe, and 323 integrations. In the Middle East and Africa, there are 44 members and 20 integrations. And the number of research information systems in the region that support ORCID continues to grow.  There are currently more than 300 systems in our region that are exchanging information with the ORCID Registry.  

Congratulations and kudos to our top sharers, who are helping all of us realize our open research goals!

Affiliations: To date, the top members asserting affiliations on ORCID records are: the University of Oxford (11.000+), King's College London (3,800+), Universidad de Zaragoza (3,600+), Københavns Universitet (2,500+), and University College London (2,400+)

Works: Top EMEA integrators adding works include: Europe PubMed Central (2M+), INSPIRE-HEP (800.000+), Ciência Vitae (350.000+), MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute) (180.000+), and the University of Helsinki (130.000+)

Funding: The top integrator, adding the highest amount of funding items in the region is Ciência Vitae (19,000+) developed by Portuguese national funder, Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia

 

 

Most of our Registry traffic from EMEA comes from the United Kingdom, Spain and Germany -- more than two million visits to ORCID sites in July 2019!

Evolution

EMEA members are helping us evolve the services we offer and improve how we support our community.  In addition to EMEA member participation on our Board and working groups, SABINET (South Africa) and ePIC (Europe) are participating in our RIPEN project. 

We released our infographic in English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish to support discussions about “why ORCID” in our community and, during the first half of 2019, we held several virtual and face to face events, including our first webinar in Arabic, as well as co-hosted workshops with consortia and members in Israel, Turkey, Denmark, UK, and Austria

In the second half of the year we will be visiting many countries in the region, and holding “Better Together” webinars focused on funders, publishers, and research institutions.  Watch our events page for details of these and other upcoming webinars and workshops!

A big thank you to our EMEA community for your continued collaboration!

 

Blog

Reports and ORCID Recommendations from ORBIT Funder Working Group

Thu, 05 Sep 2019 - 00:00 UTC

The ORBIT project is nearing the end of its second year.  We have had the wonderful opportunity to partner with a number of research funding organizations during this time and are now happy to share an update on our work!  

The following organizations participated in the ORBIT Project

Australian Research Council - ARC (Australia) | Austrian Science Fund - FWF (Austria) | BBSRC (UK) | Canadian Institutes of Health Research - CIHR (Canada) | CONCYTEC (Peru) | Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico - CNPq (Brazil) | Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior - CAPES (Brazil) | Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia - FCT (Portugal) | Howard Hughes Medical Institute - HHMI (USA) | Japan Science and Technology Agency - JST (Japan) | Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment - MBIE (New Zealand) | National Humanities Alliance - NHA (USA) | National Research Foundation - NRF (South Africa) | Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada - NSERC (Canada) | Science and Technology Development Fund - STDF (Egypt) | Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council - SSHRC (Canada) | Swiss National Science Foundation - SNF (Switzerland) | US National Institutes of Health - NIH (USA) | Wellcome Trust (UK)

This week, we are releasing two survey reports and one set of recommendations, all developed with the ORBIT participants.  These reports are framed by the funding community’s progress with integrating ORCID into grants processes. Wellcome Trust has been collecting ORCID iDs from its applicants since 2015. They have now been joined by more funding organizations, including the Australian Research Council, which is using ORCID to enable applicants to build their application CVs; CAPES, which is using ORCID to enable international participation in its funding programs; and the US National Institutes of Health, which announced it will be using ORCID in NIH training grant applications

Look for an upcoming series of posts on these regional initiatives, coming later this year.  

Enter Once - Grant Applications

Ultimately, our goal is to enable researchers to easily share information about their activities and affiliations with grant application systems, reducing the data entry burden for them and improving data quality for funders and the broader community. In our new ORBIT: Grant Application Data Field Survey Report, we summarize data fields used by funders to collect grant application information, based on responses from nine participating national and philanthropic funders to a survey carried out as part of the ORBIT project.  Our analysis shows that the ORCID data model accommodates -- or could easily accommodate -- much of the grant applicant information required by funders. We also analyzed the amount and sources of this information in the ORCID Registry.  For the purposes of reduction of researcher burden and data quality/fidelity, it is preferable that this information is added to ORCID records by the various information systems used by researchers, as part of an existing workflow. The analysis has led to specific actions for both ORCID and funders, and we hope that its conclusions will also be more broadly useful in highlighting actions to maximize the availability of open, reusable funding information, in particular through the use of open persistent identifiers and metadata.  

Reuse Often - Grant Reporting

After working with funders to analyze data needs for workflows associated with applying for, reviewing, and awarding grants, in the second phase of ORBIT, the project team gathered information about the systems, workflows, and processes currently used by funders for research reporting and evaluation. We sought to identify inefficiencies in data-gathering and prioritize a second set of pathfinder projects to test, refine, and assess solutions. Our information-gathering took the form of an initial survey of members of the ORBIT Funder Working Group, which was also shared with a network of United States Federal funders and the Belmont Forum, to widen the reach of our investigation. In all, 13 ORBIT funders from nine countries in six continents participated, ranging from national, multidisciplinary research funding bodies to discipline-focused philanthropic funders. 

The ORBIT Funder Reporting Survey report includes the following findings: 

  • Connecting grants to subsequent research activities and outputs is the biggest challenge for funders
  • Although most funders’ reporting requests are fulfilled, much of the information is provided late or is of low quality and requires time-consuming cleanup
  • More than 50% of funders interact with researchers during the reporting process, suggesting that ORCID could be integrated into reporting workflows

The ORBIT Funder Working Group therefore makes the following recommendations: 

  • Funders, publishers, and identifier registries should work together to develop, implement, and socialize workflows that use identifiers to create and share transparent connections between people, funding, and research activities in grant and publication workflows
  • Funder reporting systems should implement digital reporting workflows that reduce reporting burden, by enabling researchers to populate web forms with information from other systems, including ORCID records, without rekeying or manual data entry
  • Funders should partner with publishers to leverage identifiers for organizations, grants, and people, to enable compliance with funder open access and data-sharing requirements
Sharing What Works

The ORBIT Funder Working Group has also developed a set of recommendations, ORCID and Grant DOIs: Engaging the Community to Ensure Openness and Transparency of Funding Information, calling for the combined use of ORCID and Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to support openness and transparency of funding information.  Their report describes specific funding system information flows, and proposes complementary actions by ORCID, Crossref, researchers, and publishers to enable open research goals.  

Want to Learn More or Get Involved?

A number of funders have signed the ORCID Funder Open Letter committing to the use of best practices for collecting ORCID iDs from applicants and sharing grant award information publicly. We welcome their support and invite all organizations that fund research and scholarship to consider joining them as signatories.

We also invite you to attend our upcoming webinars:

  • A series of Better Together webinars where researchers, funders, and vendors will share best practices and experiences of using ORCID 
  • Into ORBIT webinar where speakers from FWG organizations will discuss ORBIT reports’ recommendations and findings, as well as sharing their organization’s ORCID policy
  • Let’s Integrate webinar featuring speakers from funders large and small, who will share their experiences and demonstrate that anyone can integrate ORCID 

Watch our events page for details of these and other ORCID webinars and workshops.  If you are an ORCID member, check your monthly newsletter for a schedule of activities.  You can also register to receive our blog

As we present the findings of these reports to our community over the coming months, we invite your feedback.  We hope that we can count on you to play your part in implementing the ORBIT FWG’s recommendations, whether you’re a funder, a publisher, a research institution, or a researcher. Thank you!

Related Posts, Reports, and Webpages Blog

New Features Alert! More Information Now Included In Your ORCID Inbox Notifications

Wed, 04 Sep 2019 - 00:00 UTC

An ORCID inbox notification is added to your account every time a trusted organization (an ORCID member you have authorized) makes a change on your record. However, until now these notifications contained no details of what had been changed, which was understandably frustrating.

Now that all our member organizations have upgraded to API version 2.0 or higher,  we can make improvements to address this issue. We are excited to announce that your ORCID inbox notification now includes details of each item that has been added or updated. If you’ve also signed up for email notifications, you’ll see the changes in our email message too. 

The new notification includes details of the additions or updates to the affiliation, funding, work, peer review, or research resources sections on your ORCID record. So you can easily see the changes that have been made, each trusted organization that has updated your record is listed separately, together with each individual activity that they have updated. 

 

Please see our Knowledge Base article for more information on notifications and frequency settings. 

Tell us what you think!

We value feedback from our community, so please let us know what you think about this new functionality, and share any suggestions you have to further improve the ORCID Registry or APIs. Thank you!

Blog

¡Grandes logros en Perú!

Tue, 03 Sep 2019 - 16:31 UTC

¡Han pasado casi dos años desde nuestro artículo "ORCID en Latinoamérica: Novedades", en el cual celebramos los logros de CONCYTEC como un verdadero pionero de ORCID y el primer miembro en América Latina en ser reconocido en nuestro programa Collect & Connect! CONCYTEC es la agencia peruana cuyo propósito es regular, dirigir, guiar, financiar, coordinar, supervisar y evaluar las acciones del país en Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Tecnológica, y promover e impulsar su desarrollo.

En aquel entonces, alrededor de 8000 investigadores peruanos ya tenían su ORCID iD conectado al sistema nacional de currículos, DINA - ahora CTI Vitae1, y ORCID contaba con el apoyo de dos organizaciones miembro: la Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC) y el CONCYTEC.

 

 .         

 

Dos años después, CONCYTEC ha integrado ORCID en CTI Vitae, plataforma en la cual 22000 investigadores peruanos han conectado su ORCID iD1.

En el 2019, festejamos también la llegada de cinco nuevos miembros institucionales en Perú: Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Universidad Andina del Cusco, Universidad Continental, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos y Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia.

Además, los usuarios peruanos han estado constantemente entre los cinco principales países en consultar el Registro ORCID en los últimos tres años, ¡una gran indicación del beneficio de ORCID para la comunidad!

CONCYTEC y ORCID

CONCYTEC es parte de la comunidad ORCID desde 2015 y fue la primera agencia de financiación gubernamental de América Latina en integrarse con ORCID. Sus integraciones ORCID con DINA (la plataforma nacional de CV, ahora renombrada CTI Vitae) y ALICIA (el repositorio nacional de acceso abierto), permiten a los investigadores importar publicaciones de su registro ORCID a su CTI Vitae, y exportar sus contribuciones de ALICIA a su registro ORCID. Esto significa menos carga administrativa para los investigadores peruanos y mayor visibilidad internacional para la investigación local.

"ORCID es un elemento de primera importancia para la interoperabilidad nacional e internacional de la Red Nacional de Información en los sistemas de CTI, y para aumentar la visibilidad de los investigadores peruanos".

- Dirección de Evaluación y Gestión del Conocimiento (DEGC) - CONCYTEC

El proyecto PerúCRIS 

El proyecto PerúCRIS tiene como objetivo establecer, desarrollar y operar la Red Nacional de Información en CTI, lo que permitirá la consolidación y gestión de la información científica y académica en todo el Perú. También permitirá la generación de estadísticas para apoyar la toma de decisiones, a nivel institucional, regional, sectorial y nacional, además de hacer visibles las actividades, capacidades y producción científica de los investigadores peruanos a nivel mundial.

La construcción de la Red Nacional de Información en CTI requiere la incorporación de mejores prácticas en la gestión de la información de investigación. Para lograr este objetivo, CONCYTEC ha establecido alianzas estratégicas con instituciones clave en la comunidad internacional de ciencia abierta: DURASPACE, euroCRIS, LA Referencia, COAR y ORCID.

 

Campaña de adopción ORCID

En octubre de 2018, CONCYTEC lanzó una campaña para la adopción nacional de ORCID como el identificador persistente único para los investigadores a nivel nacional. Esto significa que se espera que todos los investigadores peruanos tengan un ORCID iD. El proyecto también incluye:

  • Integración ORCID. Inicio de sesión autenticado en CTI Vitae a través de ORCID, más la posibilidad de importar y exportar publicaciones hacia y desde ORCID y CTI Vitae.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Entrenamiento ORCID. CONCYTEC ha estado trabajando activamente con las instituciones de investigación peruanas para compartir las mejores prácticas de ORCID para investigadores y sus organizaciones. Este enfoque incluye visitas y capacitación in situ, seminarios web dedicados y seminarios generales. ORCID está trabajando desde 2018 con CONCYTEC en una serie de seminarios web para investigadores y organizaciones, continuando hasta el 2019. Para ver más información, incluido un calendario de actividades y videos, o para registrarse en un próximo seminario web, visite Talleres ORCID.

  • Afiliación institucional y coordinador de afiliación. Esta funcionalidad permite a las instituciones monitorear el avance de la adopción ORCID de sus investigadores.

Trabajo conjunto

En julio del año pasado, CONCYTEC organizó la Primera Reunión de Gestores de Información de CTI, que reunió a representantes de 141 universidades peruanas públicas y privadas, y 25 instituciones públicas de investigación. Representantes de organizaciones clave de América Latina y Europa relacionadas con la gestión de información sobre CTI, incluidas La Referencia, ORCID, EuroCRIS, 4Science, DuraSpace, CINECA y otras, compartieron actualizaciones de tecnología, así como estándares y mejores prácticas en el área.

Unos meses más tarde, en octubre, CONCYTEC y ORCID co-patrocinaron un taller en la Universidad ESAN, en el cual compartimos el progreso hasta la fecha y los planes futuros con la comunidad. Representantes de dos miembros de ORCID en la región - Universidad Autónoma San Luís Potosí (UASLP, México) y Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC) - también compartieron sus experiencias de implementación de ORCID.

Durante 2019, CONCYTEC y ORCID están llevando a cabo una serie de seminarios web conjuntos para investigadores y para instituciones de investigación, explicando los beneficios de la membresía a ORCID, y ambas organizaciones también estarán en la conferencia Latmetrics, en Cusco este noviembre próximo.

 

¡Sepa más sobre ORCID y CONCYTEC en este excelente video que CONCYTEC preparó sobre nuestro trabajo juntos!

Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas: un precursor

La UPC fue uno de nuestros primeros miembros en América Latina, y el segundo en Perú, se unió a ORCID en 2016. Una de las primeras acciones de UPC fue integrar ORCID con el repositorio digital institucional, por lo que es obligatorio para todos los investigadores, al depositar tesis y disertaciones, tener y compartir su ORCID iD, y así facilitar a los autores el registro de sus obras. Este proyecto incluyó la producción de campañas y material para facilitar la creación de ORCID iDs por parte de los investigadores.

Como resultado de esa directiva, hoy la UPC tiene más de 2000 investigadores que cuentan con su ORCID iD, lo que a su vez permitió las siguientes acciones:

  • Adopción de un identificador único para usuarios en el contexto digital de la Universidad;

  • Estandarización de nombres de usuario al registrar información en sistemas de información académicos y de investigación;

  • Generación de una cultura organizacional que permite a los usuarios mantener una forma única de registrar la autoría de su trabajo;

  • Las publicaciones científicas de la UPC desarrollaron una política de incluir los IDs ORCID del autor.

 

Libio Huaroto es el Jefe de Repositorios en UPC, un experto en gestión de repositorios y un entusiasta de ORCID:

"Indudablemente, la incorporación de ORCID y otros identificadores en los procesos académicos y editoriales de la Universidad han mejorado el trabajo de investigación, facilitado su difusión y mejorado su seguimiento".

 

Con todas estas excelentes noticias que contar, ¡estamos muy contentos de seguir trabajando en la construcción de la comunidad ORCID en Perú y de ayudar a establecer nuestro segundo consorcio en América Latina!

 

1 Fuente: CONCYTEC (https://perucris.concytec.gob.pe/adopcion-orcid)

Blog

¡Grandes logros en Perú!

Tue, 03 Sep 2019 - 16:22 UTC

¡Han pasado casi dos años desde nuestro artículo "ORCID en Latinoamérica: Novedades", en el cual celebramos los logros de CONCYTEC como un verdadero pionero de ORCID y el primer miembro en América Latina en ser reconocido en nuestro programa Collect & Connect! CONCYTEC es la agencia peruana cuyo propósito es regular, dirigir, guiar, financiar, coordinar, supervisar y evaluar las acciones del país en Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Tecnológica, y promover e impulsar su desarrollo.

En aquel entonces, alrededor de 8000 investigadores peruanos ya tenían su ORCID iD conectado al sistema nacional de currículos, DINA - ahora CTI Vitae1, y ORCID contaba con el apoyo de dos organizaciones miembro: la Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC) y el CONCYTEC.

Dos años después, CONCYTEC ha integrado ORCID en CTI Vitae, plataforma en la cual 22000 investigadores peruanos han conectado su ORCID iD1.

En el 2019, festejamos también la llegada de cinco nuevos miembros institucionales en Perú: Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Universidad Andina del Cusco, Universidad Continental, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos y Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia.

Además, los usuarios peruanos han estado constantemente entre los cinco principales países en consultar el Registro ORCID en los últimos tres años, ¡una gran indicación del beneficio de ORCID para la comunidad!

CONCYTEC y ORCID

CONCYTEC es parte de la comunidad ORCID desde 2015 y fue la primera agencia de financiación gubernamental de América Latina en integrarse con ORCID. Sus integraciones ORCID con DINA (la plataforma nacional de CV, ahora renombrada CTI Vitae) y ALICIA (el repositorio nacional de acceso abierto), permiten a los investigadores importar publicaciones de su registro ORCID a su CTI Vitae, y exportar sus contribuciones de ALICIA a su registro ORCID. Esto significa menos carga administrativa para los investigadores peruanos y mayor visibilidad internacional para la investigación local.

"ORCID es un elemento de primera importancia para la interoperabilidad nacional e internacional de la Red Nacional de Información en los sistemas de CTI, y para aumentar la visibilidad de los investigadores peruanos".

- Dirección de Evaluación y Gestión del Conocimiento (DEGC) - CONCYTEC

El proyecto PerúCRIS 

El proyecto PerúCRIS tiene como objetivo establecer, desarrollar y operar la Red Nacional de Información en CTI, lo que permitirá la consolidación y gestión de la información científica y académica en todo el Perú. También permitirá la generación de estadísticas para apoyar la toma de decisiones, a nivel institucional, regional, sectorial y nacional, además de hacer visibles las actividades, capacidades y producción científica de los investigadores peruanos a nivel mundial.

La construcción de la Red Nacional de Información en CTI requiere la incorporación de mejores prácticas en la gestión de la información de investigación. Para lograr este objetivo, CONCYTEC ha establecido alianzas estratégicas con instituciones clave en la comunidad internacional de ciencia abierta: DURASPACE, euroCRIS, LA Referencia, COAR y ORCID.

 

Campaña de adopción ORCID

En octubre de 2018, CONCYTEC lanzó una campaña para la adopción nacional de ORCID como el identificador persistente único para los investigadores a nivel nacional. Esto significa que se espera que todos los investigadores peruanos tengan un ORCID iD. El proyecto también incluye:

  • Integración ORCID. Inicio de sesión autenticado en CTI Vitae a través de ORCID, más la posibilidad de importar y exportar publicaciones hacia y desde ORCID y CTI Vitae.

  • Entrenamiento ORCID. CONCYTEC ha estado trabajando activamente con las instituciones de investigación peruanas para compartir las mejores prácticas de ORCID para investigadores y sus organizaciones. Este enfoque incluye visitas y capacitación in situ, seminarios web dedicados y seminarios generales. ORCID está trabajando desde 2018 con CONCYTEC en una serie de seminarios web para investigadores y organizaciones, continuando hasta el 2019. Para ver más información, incluido un calendario de actividades y videos, o para registrarse en un próximo seminario web, visite Talleres ORCID.

  • Afiliación institucional y coordinador de afiliación. Esta funcionalidad permite a las instituciones monitorear el avance de la adopción ORCID de sus investigadores.

Trabajo conjunto

En julio del año pasado, CONCYTEC organizó la Primera Reunión de Gestores de Información de CTI, que reunió a representantes de 141 universidades peruanas públicas y privadas, y 25 instituciones públicas de investigación. Representantes de organizaciones clave de América Latina y Europa relacionadas con la gestión de información sobre CTI, incluidas La Referencia, ORCID, EuroCRIS, 4Science, DuraSpace, CINECA y otras, compartieron actualizaciones de tecnología, así como estándares y mejores prácticas en el área.

Unos meses más tarde, en octubre, CONCYTEC y ORCID co-patrocinaron un taller en la Universidad ESAN, en el cual compartimos el progreso hasta la fecha y los planes futuros con la comunidad. Representantes de dos miembros de ORCID en la región - Universidad Autónoma San Luís Potosí (UASLP, México) y Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC) - también compartieron sus experiencias de implementación de ORCID.

Durante 2019, CONCYTEC y ORCID están llevando a cabo una serie de seminarios web conjuntos para investigadores y para instituciones de investigación, explicando los beneficios de la membresía a ORCID, y ambas organizaciones también estarán en la conferencia Latmetrics, en Cusco este noviembre próximo.

 

¡Sepa más sobre ORCID y CONCYTEC en este excelente video que CONCYTEC preparó sobre nuestro trabajo juntos!

Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas: un precursor

La UPC fue uno de nuestros primeros miembros en América Latina, y el segundo en Perú, se unió a ORCID en 2016. Una de las primeras acciones de UPC fue integrar ORCID con el repositorio digital institucional, por lo que es obligatorio para todos los investigadores, al depositar tesis y disertaciones, tener y compartir su ORCID iD, y así facilitar a los autores el registro de sus obras. Este proyecto incluyó la producción de campañas y material para facilitar la creación de ORCID iDs por parte de los investigadores.

Como resultado de esa directiva, hoy la UPC tiene más de 2000 investigadores que cuentan con su ORCID iD, lo que a su vez permitió las siguientes acciones:

  • Adopción de un identificador único para usuarios en el contexto digital de la Universidad;

  • Estandarización de nombres de usuario al registrar información en sistemas de información académicos y de investigación;

  • Generación de una cultura organizacional que permite a los usuarios mantener una forma única de registrar la autoría de su trabajo;

  • Las publicaciones científicas de la UPC desarrollaron una política de incluir los IDs ORCID del autor.

  •  

Libio Huaroto es el Jefe de Repositorios en UPC, un experto en gestión de repositorios y un entusiasta de ORCID:

"Indudablemente, la incorporación de ORCID y otros identificadores en los procesos académicos y editoriales de la Universidad han mejorado el trabajo de investigación, facilitado su difusión y mejorado su seguimiento".

 

Con todas estas excelentes noticias que contar, ¡estamos muy contentos deseguir trabajando en la construcción de la comunidad ORCID en Perú y de ayudar a establecer nuestro segundo consorcio en América Latina!

 

1 Fuente: CONCYTEC (https://perucris.concytec.gob.pe/adopcion-orcid)

Blog

All About the New Zealand ORCID Hub

Mon, 02 Sep 2019 - 00:00 UTC

Please can you briefly describe the New Zealand ORCID Hub?

The New Zealand ORCID Hub allows all Consortium members to productively engage with ORCID regardless of technical resources. As consortium lead, Royal Society Te Apārangi is responsible for developing and maintaining the Hub.  The Hub is a software application with a simple user interface that allows member organisations to request permission from researchers to read from and write to their ORCID records. Once the researcher grants this permission, the organisation can enter authenticated information into their researcher's ORCID record. The Hub is used by 26 of our 51 members, and has been the conduit by which items have been shared with the ORCID records of over 2,800 researchers. More about the Hub is on our consortium web page.  

What prompted you to make a video about the Hub

We hope that having the video showing the Hub’s simple interface will prompt more members to use it and engage some members who haven’t yet started their ORCID journey.  Our national consortium funder, Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment (MBIE), were keen on us using the video as a resource to complement our quarterly consortium newsletter. We wanted to reach a variety of audiences including existing consortium members who have not yet engaged with ORCID or the Hub, existing Hub users who may not be aware of all its features, and potential new consortium members who would benefit from seeing how to use the Hub to write to ORCID records.

What features of the Hub were you keen to showcase?

The ability to upload a variety of batch files was a key driver in the Hub’s design. Most people are comfortable creating information to upload using Excel spreadsheets, which they can simply convert to a csv for the Hub, using Excel’s ‘save as’ function. More technically confident people can upload information in either json or yaml formats if they want to write more complex information to ORCID records, such as the contributors for multi-authored papers or funds awarded to groups of people.

We wanted the video to show how easy the Hub is to use, so Jill used screen capture software to record herself running a dummy affiliation file through our test hub, which interacts with ORCID’s sandbox. This shows the whole process:  choosing the section of the ORCID record you want to write to using the Hub’s ‘task menu’ (upload affiliations, funding, works, keywords, etc.); uploading a simple csv file, generated using Excel, containing the information to be written to the ORCID record(s); the researcher receiving an email from the Hub explaining that their organisation wants to write an affiliation to their ORCID record; the researcher being taken to ORCID to grant permission; and the information being immediately written to their ORCID record, with the user’s organisation -- in the preferred name format -- shown as the source of the information.

We also wanted to incorporate some interviews with existing Hub users to capture what is important to them, so we sent out a request for volunteers to participate. We were delighted when two members volunteered – one from a large university and the other from a small polytechnic. Both gave a great overview of how using the Hub saves their organisations’ internal resources because they don’t have to develop their own ORCID integrations.

What reactions have you had to the video, so far?

We have had some great feedback, including from one existing user who discovered that the Hub also allowed her to set up webhooks; we are delighted that her organisation is now trialling this feature.

Are there any features of the Hub that you weren’t able to capture in the video?

We wanted to keep the video fairly short, which meant we could not include all the Hub’s features. Apart from the web-forms for viewing, and editing, records, tools for managing ‘group ids’ for peer review, the Hub’s user reports, and its API, one key thing we did not show was the ease of onboarding an organisation. An authenticated technical contact simply clicks a button from within the Hub to be taken to ORCID’s API registration page with the necessary details pre-filled. We provide a simple interface for our members to self-manage their API credentials, as well as confirming that they are valid before accepting them.

We recommend that any organisation intending to use the Hub also implements a communications campaign so that researchers and contributors are ready when the Hub email arrives in their mailboxes, and less likely to delete it as potential spam. We work with our member organisations on communications, if required, and have some template messages that they can use to explain ORCID and the Hub to their research community.

How does the Hub -- and this video -- augment the goals of the NZ ORCID consortium? 

The New Zealand Government is covering the cost of ORCID membership for funders, and higher education and research organisations that are supported with public funds. By providing both an opportunity for ORCID membership without direct fiscal obligation, and a simple user interface in the form of the Hub to lower barriers to participation, we are hoping the New Zealand ORCID Consortium can span the whole of New Zealand’s public research sector. The video is intended as a tool to encourage the goals set out in our Advisory Committee’s vision:

  • that our researchers are recognised for their contributions to our research, science and innovation system
  • that our institutions populate and use data from ORCID records to improve data quality and reuse, and reduce the reporting burden
  • that using ORCID will help to improve the performance of our research system for the benefit of everyone here, and across the world

Related posts:

Blog

We'll Be Rocking Your World Again At PIDapalooza 2020!

Mon, 19 Aug 2019 - 00:00 UTC

The official countdown to PIDapalooza 2020 -- the open festival of persistent identifiers (PIDs) -- begins here! With 162 days to go until our opening ceremony at the fabulous Belem Cultural Center in Lisbon, Portugal, your friendly neighborhood PIDapalooza Planning Committee -- Helena Cousijn (DataCite), Maria Gould (CDL), Stephanie Harley (ORCID), Ginny Hendricks (Crossref), and Alice Meadows (ORCID) -- are already hard at work making sure it’s the best one so far! We have a shiny new website, with loads more information than before, including the PIDapalooza playlists, a photo gallery, and of course registration information -- look out for updates there and on Twitter.

And, led by Helena, the Program Committee is starting its search for sessions that meet PIDapalooza’s goals of being PID-focused and fun, informative and interactive.  If you’ve got a PID story to share, a PID practice to recommend, or a PID technology to launch, the Committee wants to hear from you! Please send your ideas, using this form, by September 27. We aim to finalize the program by early November.

Please tie your proposal into one of the six conference themes :

  1. Putting Principles into Practice. FAIR, Plan S, the 4 Cs in Metadata 2020; principles are everywhere. Do you have examples of how PIDs helped you put principles into practice? We’d love to hear your story!
  2. PID Communities. We believe PIDs don’t work without community around them. We would like to hear from you about best practice among PID communities so we can learn from each other and spread the word even further!
  3. PID Success Stories. We already know PIDs are great, but which strategies worked? Share your victories! Which strategies failed? Let’s turn these into success stories together!
  4. Achieving Persistence through Sustainability. Persistence is a key part of PIDs, but there can’t be persistence without sustainability. Share how you sustain your PIDs or how PIDs help you with sustainability?
  5. Bridging Worlds - Social and Technical. What would make heterogeneous PID systems 'interoperate' optimally? Would standardized metadata and APIs across PID types solve many of the problems, and if so, how would that be achieved? And what about the social aspects? How do we bridge the gaps between different stakeholder groups and communities?
  6. PID party. You don’t just learn about PIDs through powerpoints. What about games? Interpretive dance? Get creative and let us know what kind of activity you’d like to organize at PIDapalooza this year!

We hope you’re as excited about PIDapalooza 2020 as we are.  We look forward to seeing you there!

The PIDapalooza 2020 Planning Committee

Helena Cousijn (DataCite), Maria Gould (California Digital Library), Ginny Hendricks (Crossref), Stephanie Harley (ORCID), Alice Meadows (ORCID)

PIDapalooza: the essentials

  • What? PIDapalooza 2020 - the open festival of persistent identifiers
  • When? January 29-30, 2020 (kickoff party the evening of January 28)
  • Where? Belem Cultural Center, Lisbon, Portugal
  • Why? To think, talk, live persistent identifiers for two whole days with your fellow PID enthusiasts
Blog

New Features Alert! Combining Work Items

Mon, 05 Aug 2019 - 00:00 UTC

As we continue to celebrate the Year of the Researcher as part of our 2019 Project Roadmap, we are excited to launch two new features which will allow you to combine works on your ORCID record. 

Information about the same work may be added to ORCID records from different sources.  ORCID will automatically group together, work items with the same identifier. With our new combining functionality, you can now combine work items from different sources that use different identifiers.  

How to combine work items into a group

To manually select and combine work items, first sign in to your ORCID record.  Navigate to your Works section and select the work items that you would like to combine.  Finally, choose the COMBINE option from under the Works header section. This brief video shows you how.

Note that the Combine function creates a group of items, and does not merge the items.  The combined items will group under the preferred version. 

Want some help?

In addition to the combine process, we can now also suggest which items to combine, based on title matching criteria. These suggestions are accessible by clicking the “Manage similar works” button under the Works header on your record. You can review the list, adjust as needed, and then confirm the combination.  As with the manual process for combining, all items are grouped under the preferred work item. This short video shows how it works. 

More information

For more information about combining works into groups, please read our KnowledgeBase article. And tell us what you think!  Contact us at support@orcid.org to share any suggestions you have to help improve the ORCID Registry or APIs. Thank you!

Blog

Great achievements in Peru!

Thu, 01 Aug 2019 - 00:00 UTC

It has been almost two years since our "Collect & Connect: Focus on Latin America" post, when we celebrated CONCYTEC`s achievements as a true ORCID pioneer as the first member in Latin America to be recognized in our Collect & Connect program! CONCYTEC is the Peruvian agency which purpose is to regulate, direct, guide, finance, coordinate, supervise and evaluate the country`s actions in Science, Technology and Technological Innovation, and to promote and drive its development.

Back then, around 8,000 Peruvian researchers had their ORCID iD connected to the national cv system, DINA (now CTI Vitae)1, and ORCID had the support of two member organizations: Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC) and CONCYTEC.

Fast forward two years. CONCYTEC has integrated ORCID into the national CV platform, CTI Vitae, to which now 22,000 Peruvian researchers have connected their ORCID iD1.  

We have also welcomed five more organizations in Peru as ORCID members, in 2019: Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Universidad Andina del Cusco, Universidad Continental, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, and Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia.

In addition, Peruvian users have been consistently amongst the top five countries to use the ORCID Registry over the past three years, a great indication of the benefit of ORCID to the community!

  

  CONCYTEC and ORCID

CONCYTEC has been part of the ORCID community since 2015 and was the first Latin American governmental funding agency to integrate with ORCID. Their ORCID  integrations with DINA (the national cv platform, now renamed CTI Vitae) and ALICIA (the national open access repository), allow researchers to import publications from their ORCID record to their CTI Vitae, and to export their contributions from ALICIA to their ORCID record. This means less administrative burden for Peruvian researchers and increased international visibility for local research.

"ORCID is an element of first importance for the national and international interoperability of the National Information Network in CTI's systems, and to increase the visibility of Peruvian researchers". Knowledge Evaluation & Management Office (DEGC)  - CONCYTEC

  The PeruCRIS project

The PerúCRIS project aims to establish, develop, and operate the country’s National Information Network on Science, Technology and Technological Innovation in CTI, which will allow the consolidation and management of scientific and academic information throughout Peru. It will also enable the generation of statistics to support decision-making - at the institutional, regional, sectoral, and national levels - in addition to making the activities, capacities, and scientific production of Peruvian researchers globally visible.

Building the National Information Network in CTI requires the incorporation of best practices in the research information management. To achieve this goal, CONCYTEC has established strategic alliances with key institutions in the international open science community -- DURASPACE, euroCRIS, LA Referencia, COAR, and ORCID.

  Campaign for ORCID Adoption

In October 2018, CONCYTEC launched a campaign for national adoption of ORCID as the unique persistent identifier for researchers at the national level. This means that all Peruvian researchers will have an ORCID iD. The project also involves:

  • ORCID integration. Authenticated sign-in to CTI VItae through ORCID, plus the ability to import and export publications to and from ORCID and CTi Vitae

  • ORCID training. CONCYTEC has been actively reaching out to Peruvian research institutions to share ORCID`s best practices for researchers and organizations. This approach includes visits and on-site training, dedicated webinars and general webinars. ORCID has been working since 2018 with CONCYTEC on a series of webinars for researchers and organizations, continuing through 2019. To see more information, including a calendar of activities and videos, or to register for an upcoming webinar, visit Talleres ORCID
  • Institutional affiliation and affiliation coordinator. This functionality enables institutions to monitor their researchers' ORCID registration and thus track the progress of ORCID adoption
  Partnership

In July last year, CONCYTEC organized the First Meeting of STI Information Managers, bringing together representatives from 141 public and private Peruvian universities, and 25 public research institutions. Speakers from key Latin American and European organizations related to STI information management, including La Referencia, ORCID, EuroCRIS, 4Science, DuraSpace, CINECA, and others shared technology updates, as well as standards and best practices in the field.

A few months later, in October, CONCYTEC and ORCID co-sponsored a one-day workshop at Universidad ESAN, where we shared progress to date and future plans with the community. Representatives from two ORCID members in the region -- Universidad Autónoma San Luís Potosí (Mexico) and Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (Peru) -- also shared their experiences of implementing ORCID

During 2019, CONCYTEC and ORCID are running a series of joint webinars for researchers and for research institutions, explaining the benefits of ORCID membership, and both organizations will also be at the Latmetrics conference, in Cusco this November.

Learn more about ORCID and CONCYTEC in this great video CONCYTEC prepared about our work together!

  Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas: a precursor

UPC was one of our first members in Latin America, and the second in Peru, joining ORCID in 2016. One of UPC`s first actions was to integrate ORCID with the institutional digital repository, making it mandatory for all researchers depositing thesis and dissertations to have and share their ORCID iD, and facilitating for authors to register their works. This included the production of campaigns and material to facilitate the creation of ORCID iDs by researchers.

As a result, today UPC has more than 2,000 researchers with an ORCID iD, which allowed the following actions: 

  • Adoption of a unique identifier for users in the digital context of the University;
  • Standardization of user names when registering information in academic and research information systems;
  • Generation of an organizational culture that allows users to maintain a unique way of registering the authorship of their work.
  • UPC`s scientific publications developed a policy of including author`s ORCID iDs.

Libio Huaroto, Head of Repositories at UPC, a repositories management expert, and an ORCID enthusiast told us: 

"Undoubtedly, the incorporation of ORCID and other identifiers in academic and editorial processes of the University have improved research work, facilitated its dissemination and improved tracking."

 

With all the great progress being made, we are very happy to continue working on building an ORCID  community in Peru, and helping to create our second consortium in Latin America!

 

1 Source: CONCYTEC (https://perucris.concytec.gob.pe/adopcion-orcid)

Blog

Optimizing and automating - improving our Account Receivables and other processes

Tue, 30 Jul 2019 - 00:00 UTC

Besides “running the back office” through managing finances and accounting, human resources, and our internal systems and tools, the role of the ORCID Operations team is to continually work to ensure our processes are aligned with our values of transparency, persistence, and trust.

This year, we continue our work to improve our operational efficiency.  Our Operations team of four has been working on a number of projects to this end, including improvements in our accounting processes, updating our internal systems and equipment in line with our focus on researcher control and privacy, as well as improving the transparency and automation of our internal operating procedures to optimize staff time. 

We are happy to announce an important operations milestone for 2019: we have fully automated our accounts receivable process and have added international credit card processing capabilities through our new Stripe payment portal. Not only is this important for our global membership base, but we have also freed up more time for our Engagement team members to connect with you!

We are also working to establish an internal sign-on system to enable better staff access across our information platforms, as well as improving our management of external mailing lists to ensure you get our newsletters and service messages.  Look out for more Operations news in future posts!

 

Blog

Using ORCID to Connect Researchers and their Antibodies

Mon, 29 Jul 2019 - 18:17 UTC

This post is authored by Anita Bandrowski

In the early days of the Antibody Registry, we interacted with a researcher who had made a really useful antibody, which she believed had been used in “hundreds of papers.” She sent the reagent to numerous colleagues, some of whom thanked her in their papers -- but each in a different way -- while others didn’t acknowledge her contribution at all. So, when asked to produce a list of the papers that used the antibody she was at a loss. Our system for crediting producers of scholarly artifacts -- often quite useful ones -- other than papers, was quite broken. 

Today, the Antibody Registry (antibodyregistry.org) enables researchers to universally identify antibodies used in their research, by assigning unique persistent identifiers (Research Resource Identifiers or RRIDs) to each antibody. This enables the antibodies to be specifically referenced, for example, in the methods section of a paper and easily discovered by humans and search engines.  

Before the Antibody Registry started there was no way to answer a simple question such as “how many antibodies are out there for me to use?” or “what percentage of the genome is covered by antibody reagents?” It was also very difficult to  track down which antibodies were being used in a particular paper. Although the answers to these questions are still not perfect, they are closer to “the truth” than was previously possible. As you can imagine “the truth” changes each time anyone makes a reagent either in a lab or a company, however, when those reagents are published to websites by companies or in papers by researchers, the Antibody Registry can come into play, by registering the antibodies created by those researchers.  Many journals now insist that, if you reference an antibody in a paper, it should have an RRID, which then enables that antibody to be tracked throughout the literature. 

However, this does not solve the credit problem. That’s where ORCID comes in. 

The Antibody Registry has now added ORCID identifiers to our user interface, enabling the researcher who made the antibody to claim credit for it. ORCID already supports RRIDs, which means that the Antibody Registry can connect a particular reagent (e.g., RRID:AB_528484) with a specific researcher. In future, we plan to also post antibodies to ORCID records.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Antibody Registry displays ORCID iDs

 

We hope that, in the not-too-distant future, our original researcher will be able to make an antibody, register it with an RRID linked to her ORCID account, and get credit she deserves when that antibody is used by her colleagues, and their papers include both the RRID AND her connection to it as the antibody creator.   

Blog

Österreich startet sein ORCID-Konsortium

Fri, 26 Jul 2019 - 10:48 UTC

 

Dieser Beitrag wurde von Paloma Marin Arraiza und Christian Gumpenberger verfasst.

Österreich hat einen großen Schritt nach vorne gemacht, um ORCID auf nationaler Ebene einzuführen. Die offizielle ORCID Austria Auftaktveranstaltung fand am 13. Juni in Wien statt. Ko-organisiert von den Konsortiallead Organisationen TU Wien und Universität Wien und unterstützt durch ORCID und E-Infrastructures Austria Plus, war dies bereits der dritte ORCID-Workshop auf österreichischem Boden, wenngleich der erste mit einem bestehenden nationalen Konsortium. An der Auftaktveranstaltung nahmen 35 Personen aus 24 Institutionen teil und diskutierten die Vorteile und Herausforderungen einer Integration von ORCID.

Dank der Beteiligung von Paul Vierkant (Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam), Gabriela Mejias (ORCID) und Pauline Crépel (MyScienceWork) konnte die Diskussion über die Grenzen und Systeme Österreichs hinaus fortgesetzt werden. Als Vertreter des deutschen Konsortiums gab Paul Vierkant einen Einblick in ORCID-DE als DFG-gefördertes Projekt und Konsortium. Das ORCID-DE-Projekt hat die Zusammenarbeit zwischen der Deutschen Nationalbibliothek, dem Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam und der Universität Bielefeld erheblich gefördert. Diese Institutionen haben sich zum Zweck einer Kooperation an der Gemeinsamen Norm Datei (GND) und Bielefeld Academic Search Engine (BASE) zusammengeschlossen

Eine weitere lesson learned des deutschen Konsortiums ist, dass seine Mitglieder bisher durchschnittlich ein Jahr gebraucht haben, um ihre ORCID-Implementierung vom Bekunden des Interesses an einer Mitgliedschaft bis hin zum Beginn der Integration erfolgreich abzuschließen. Gabriela Mejias konzentrierte sich auf die Verwendung der ORCID-API, während Pauline Crépel die Bedeutung der Schaffung benutzerfreundlicher Systeme betonte, die sicherstellen, dass die Benutzer ihre ORCID-Einträge auf intuitive Weise mit dem integrierenden System verbinden können.

Während der Diskussionsrunde brachten die PodiumsteilnehmerInnen ihre persönlichen Ansichten und Erfahrungen mit der Integration von ORCID und der Verwendung von ORCID bei Finanzierungsanträgen ein (der Wissenschaftsfonds (FWF) ist einer der 11 Unterzeichner des ORCID Funders Open Letter).

Sie diskutierten ORCID im Zusammenhang mit den geltenden österreichischen Rechtsvorschriften über personenbezogene Daten an Universitäten und Forschungseinrichtungen (einschließlich Datenschutz) und behandelten auch Themen wie technische Schwierigkeiten oder Mangel an technischem Personal bei der Implementierung sowie Anforderungen an in Österreich verwendete Informationssysteme (z.B. OJS, PURE, Researchfish).

Die Konsortialmitglieder wurden gebeten, Feedback darüber zu geben, welche Systeme potenzielle Kandidaten für zukünftige ORCID-Integrationen in Österreich darstellen. Diese Information ist wichtig, damit die Konsortiallead Organisationen auf die Erfahrungen der globalen ORCID-Community zugreifen können, wenn die Konsortialmitglieder ORCID in diesen Systemen implementieren.

 

ORCID Austria: Was kommt als nächstes?

Nach dem offiziellen Start von ORCID Austria haben die TU Wien Bibliothek und die Universitätsbibliothek Wien die Gemeinsame Grundsatzerklärung veröffentlicht, die das Governanceund Mitgliedermodell des Konsortiums sowie die Vorteile und Möglichkeiten der institutionellen Umsetzung von ORCID enthält. Ihre Strategie konzentriert sich auf die Erreichung der folgenden Ziele bis Dezember 2021:

1. Doppelt so viele Forschende in Österreich sollen eine ORCID iD haben als zum Zeitpunkt der Gründung des Konsortiums,

2. die ORCID iDs sollen mit den Forschungsergebnissen der letzten (mindestens) 10 Jahre verlinkt werden,

3. Ministerien und Forschungsförderer sollen ORCID-Daten, soweit möglich, für die Berichterstattung und Bewertung der institutionellen Forschungsleistung nutzen.

Der Launch der ORCID Austria Website - eine Plattform mit Informationen, häufig gestellten Fragen (FAQ) und regelmäßigen Nachrichten und Updates über ORCID (sowohl in Österreich als auch international) für Konsortialmitglieder und alle Interessierten - wird in Kürze folgen. Im Dezember werden die Konsortialleads auch ein Webinar mit offener Beteiligung veranstalten, um das erste Jahr des Konsortiums zu kommentieren und einige Anwendungsfälle hervorzuheben.

Blog

Austria launches its ORCID Consortium

Fri, 26 Jul 2019 - 10:34 UTC

This post is authored by Paloma Marin Arraiza and Christian Gumpenberger

 

Austria has taken a major step to adopt ORCID on a national scale. The official ORCID Austria launch event took place in Vienna on June 13. Co-hosted by consortium lead organizations TU Wien and the University of Vienna, supported by ORCID and E-Infrastructures Austria Plus, this was the third ORCID workshop in Austria, but the very first with a national consortium in place. The launch event was attended by  35 participants from 24 institutions. They discussed the benefits and challenges of integrating ORCID. 

Thanks to the participation of Paul Vierkant (Helmholtz Centre Potsdam), Gabriela Mejias (ORCID), and Pauline Crépel (MyScienceWork), the discussion was extended beyond Austrian borders and systems. Representing the German Consortium, Paul Vierkant gave an insight into ORCID-DE as both a national-funded project and a consortium. The ORCID-DE project has fostered collaboration between the German National Library, the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, and the University of Bielefeld, which have joined forces to work on the Integrated Authority File (Gemeinsame Norm Datei – GND) and the Bielefeld Academic Search Engine (BASE). Another lesson learned from the German consortium is that, to date their members have taken about a year to complete their ORCID implementation, from the expression of interest in membership until the integration launch. Gabriela Mejias focused on the use of the ORCID API, while Pauline Crépel stressed the importance of creating user-friendly systems -- ensuring that users can connect their ORCID records with the integrating system in an intuitive way. 

During a roundtable discussion, the panelists contributed their personal views and experience with integrating ORCID, and the use of ORCID in funding applications  (the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) is one of the 11 ORCID Funders Open Letter signatories). They discussed ORCID in relation to current Austrian legislation on personal data within universities and research institutions, including data privacy, technical difficulties or lack of technical staff, and requirements for information systems used in Austria (for instance, OJS, PURE, Researchfish). Consortium members were asked to provide feedback on which systems are potential candidates for future ORCID integrations in Austria, so that the consortium leads  can leverage the global ORCID community as consortium members implement ORCID in these systems.n.

ORCID Austria: What’s next?

Following the official launch of ORCID Austria, TU Wien Bibliothek and the Vienna University Library have published the Joint Statement of Principles that includes the consortium’s governance and membership model, as well as the advantages and opportunities of ORCID institutional implementation. Their strategy focuses on achieving the following goals by December 2021:

1. Double the number of researchers in Austria that have an ORCID iD, compared with the estimated number of iDs at the time the consortium was established

2. All Austrian researchers’ ORCID iDs should be connected with their research outputs from at least the last 10 years

3. Austrian ministries and funders, as far as possible, should use ORCID data to evaluate and report on  institutional research performance

The launch of the consortium website --  a platform with information, frequently asked questions, and regular news and updates about ORCID (both in Austria and internationally) for consortium members and beyond will follow shortly and, in December, the consortium leads will also host an open participation webinar to comment on the first year of the consortium and highlight some implementation use cases.

Blog

Using ORCID to Re-imagine Research Attribution

Mon, 22 Jul 2019 - 15:00 UTC

Richard Wynne

Founder and CEO of Rescognito, Inc.

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9217-0407

https://rescognito.com/0000-0002-9217-0407

 

In comments made during 2018 Council of Science Editors plenary address Alison Mudditt, the then recently appointed CEO of PLOS, observed that “research is not article shaped”. In other words, research outputs now encompass far more than can be effectively encapsulated in the seventeenth-century construct of a research paper.

With almost $2trillion dollars invested globally in research each year1, let’s just say that research funders and academic institutions are increasingly curious about outputs such as data, software, algorithms, protocols, mentoring, public impact, etc.

At the other end of the research ecosystem, researchers (especially early career researchers) are frustrated that their many contributions to research output are overlooked by traditional measures of impact. As noted by Stephen Curry, at Imperial College London, “Researchers deserve to be judged on the basis of what they have done, not simply where they have published — and to be given credit for the many contributions they make above and beyond the publication of research papers.”

 

In light of these needs, we founded Rescognito with the idea that research credit and recognition should be:

 

·      Open (free for individual researchers)

·      Transparent (direct recognition, not via opaque measures of impact)

·      Democratic (anyone with an ORCID iD can participate)

·      Granular (a broad range of research outputs recognizable)

·      Attributable (tied to an authenticated ORCID iD or institution)

·      Standards-based (ORCID, DOI, ROR, and CRediT)

 

For these reasons, ORCID was a natural partner for building a new platform designed to integrate with the existing ecosystem. The objective of Rescognito is not to “disrupt” or to “dis-intermediate”, but to work with existing scholarly societies and other participants, keeping them at the heart of research evaluation and reputation management. Rescognito does not store content, it is not a social network nor workflow system; it is just a thin layer exclusively focused on recognition of a wide variety of research contributions. 

Using our platform, recognition is attributed using a counter called a “COG” (short for ReCOGnition) and the ORCID iD of the person granting the recognition. By themselves COG totals are a relatively superficial metric; but because they are open, transparent and attributable, we anticipate that layers of analytics, visualization and possibly AI will provide valuable insights into research trends and people.

We use the CRediT3 taxonomy, supplemented with a continuously-evolving list of home-grown recognition reasons (feedback welcome!) useful for recognizing non-article-based contributions and non-science works in the humanities and arts:

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to ORCID our system can reliably identify research professionals (for example, the afore-mentioned Stephen Curry along with his works: https://rescognito.com/0000-0002-0552-8870):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ORCID integration ensures that the recognizing person is also transparently and reliably identified (for example, https://rescognito.com/0000-0002-7563-0125):


 

 

 

 

 

Rescognito also allows self-recognition as a way to claim/assign CRediT for a previously published work (for example, https://rescognito.com/0000-0002-0673-1360):  

 

Our upcoming launch in September of 2019 will include Institutional Recognition meaning that organizations will be able to recognize research behaviors and outputs that they want to encourage and reward. 

Also in upcoming in September is article-based-recognition that will allow multiple contributors (provided they have an ORCID iD in the metadata) to be recognized for multiple CRediT contributions in one action.


 

 

 

 

 

 

If you would like more information, please contact us (link to https://rescognito.com/contact.php).

In summary, will recognition make any difference?  I can’t say it better than Alex Holcombe in his recent Nature article:

“Will making less-acknowledged roles more visible really change things? It will. Research institutes recruiting for positions such as programmers, statisticians and project managers will have better information for hiring. Applicants for grants will find it easier to show funders that they have the right skills. The allocation of scientific resources will shift to more effective combinations of researchers.”4

Blog

The Israeli ORCID consortium one year on

Mon, 22 Jul 2019 - 12:12 UTC

Our first year

The Israeli ORCID consortium was officially established in July 2018 a few months after the first ORCID workshop in the country, following the decision to build a national research database and portal. The consortium is led by the Inter-University Computation Center (IUCC) and includes eight of the nine Universities in Israel. We expect the Open University of Israel to join as a member soon.

Our consortium goals are to raise awareness about ORCID among the research community in Israel, and promote ORCID integration with Israeli academic journals and grant applications for Israeli research funds. Our current efforts are focused on ORCID implementation in national databases, such as:

  • National name authority file (Maintained by the National Library of Israel)
  • Academic library catalogues 
  • Indexes of academic Israeli publications in Arabic and Hebrew

Our first year of operation has been very productive in terms of bringing the community together to work on ORCID implementation. In March, we hosted the second ORCID workshop in the country -- our first as an established consortium. It was a great opportunity for members to share their progress to date, discuss challenges, and examine the national research network plan. Currently six members have completed an ORCID integration and the other two are in the development stage. As required for  our national research network plans, all integrations collect authenticated iDs and push affiliation data and keywords. 

More recently, I attended the ORCID Consortia Workshop to present two regional integrations and a poster about our consortium multilingual challenges. The ORCID Israeli consortium was recognized there with an  award “For Excellence in Fostering ORCID integrations”.  

 

National CRIS plan and next steps

The Israeli national  research database and portal will be based on independent installations of CRIS (Current Research Information System) in each of the universities, plus an aggregated environment for showcasing and benchmarking overall research resources and outputs in Israel. 

The main challenge faced when designing the national research environment, was that CRIS systems usually harvest works from databases that prioritize STEM researchers publishing in English. Humanities research outputs (e.g. conference proceedings, books, theses and dissertations, etc.) and works in Hebrew and Arabic are often missing from their automated harvesting. For that reason, the ability to assign all kind of works to the correct researcher, institution, organizational unit, and hierarchy, and to capture publications both in Hebrew and Arabic were among our central requirements for a national CRIS provider. 

ORCID is an essential part of our national CRIS infrastructure as it allows us to synchronize data from different systems and thus overcome those challenges. So, when selecting a CRIS provider, we had the following requirements:

  • Use ORCID to identify and connect affiliation, works and funding data with researchers
  • Integrate the ORCID API for authentication, and as an identification key in the database and when communicating with other systems
  • Enable synchronization: continuously read, write, and update information from/to ORCID records

For the first phase of this project, all consortium members have to integrate ORCID and their HR systems to collect read/write permissions from researchers and to assert employment data (and sometimes keywords) to records. As part of this process, ORCID iDs will be stored in each institutional HR system, along with other personal details and identifiers. The use of HR systems for this was recommended because they have several advantages: they are designed to store personal information, providing both security and privacy; and they are already integrated with many other institutional systems (Research, Library, CMS, etc.). HR systems will be one of the sources for the national CRIS.

After analyzing the bid proposals received, we’ll announce the selected CRIS provider, probably in September, and start the next phase of the project. The next goal for member integrations is to read and write works data from ORCID records (using the CRIS), and to read keywords that describe fields of expertise.

Look for more news on our progress and other consortium updates soon!

Blog

ORCID at Scale: Improving our own Infrastructure

Thu, 18 Jul 2019 - 16:15 UTC

Are you interested in learning about how we host the ORCID Registry and APIs? Would like to know how we deal with high availability, scalability, and recovery in the event of a disaster? If so, then this post is for you! 

We handle eight million page views each month on the ORCID Registry, but the bulk of our traffic is on the APIs, which currently receive over 100 million hits per month. One of our core strategies is to invest in developing a robust information infrastructure, so we need to be confident that the technology we use to support this usage is reliable and secure.

The Registry and the rest of the website on orcid.org are routed through a Content Delivery Network (CDN) -- a cloud service provider that has 150+ datacenters around the world. When your browser connects to orcid.org, the static parts of the site are served from a local datacenter near you, to enable faster load times.

The CDN has some other useful features, such as protection against distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, and real-time security scanning against hacking threats.

The Registry pages are hosted at our main datacenter, where traffic is load-balanced across a cluster of app servers, while the Registry data are stored in a cluster of three powerful database servers, on encrypted file systems. One is a master database, where updates are made and two are replica servers, which receive a copy of the data in real time. The replica servers are used for most of the “read” operations of the Registry and APIs, but are also hot standby servers meaning they can be promoted to be the master in the event of a failure.

We have an assortment of other servers supporting the production system, which shuffle data around to build search indexes, keep an up to date dump of public data in a different data center, and run scheduled tasks such as email reminders.

We automatically backup the database twice daily, encrypt the dump, and push it to another cloud service provider on a different continent so that, in the event of a disaster at our main datacenter, we can use the database backup to restore the system. We regularly test that this process is working using a temporary offline server.

This is a solid base. However, ORCiD keeps growing and we are increasingly relied upon as part of the research information infrastructure. So we need to do more to ensure the community can continue to depend on us.

What would we like to improve?

We’d like to have app servers and database replicas in multiple locations, so that we don’t have to rely on the somewhat lengthy database restore process, or lose data since the last backup. We’d like to be able to provision new servers in a matter of minutes, rather than hours, in case of sudden increase in demand.

We are considering separating the most critical parts of the system such as registration, sign in, and authorization to an isolated system, and would also like to ensure that public API traffic problems do not impact the Registry and Member APIs.

And we’d like a more flexible architecture using industry standard technologies such as Docker containers and Kubernetes, which will help us to make the improvements mentioned above.

Let us know what you think about our plans! How do we compare with your own organization and other services you rely on? Is there more we could or should be doing? Do you have any advice for us based on your own experience? Contact us with your input and feedback!

Blog

Meet ORCID Publisher Member, PLOS

Mon, 01 Jul 2019 - 00:00 UTC

PLOS has been an enthusiastic supporter of ORCID since joining as a member in 2013. They recently adopted our peer review functionality, enabling their reviewers to get credit and recognition for the important work they do. In this interview, their Publisher and Executive Editor and ORCID Board Chair, Veronique Kiermer, tells us more about PLOS and ORCID.

Please can you tell us a bit about PLOS and your role there?

PLOS is a nonprofit Open Access science publisher. Our mission is to empower researchers to accelerate progress in scientific communication by ensuring the discoverability, accessibility, and recognition of their work. We publish seven journals with varying scopes and criteria.

I am the Publisher and Executive Editor at PLOS. Among other things, I work with the editorial and publishing teams across all journals to set the editorial direction and develop policies and programs that promote Open Science practices. We see Open Science as a critical ingredient to ensure the rigor and integrity of the content we publish, and also as an important element of how science is increasingly conducted. We work with researchers to facilitate best practices and to help them receive credit.  

When and why did you get involved with ORCID personally?

I first became involved with ORCID in the early days of the organization. At the time, I was working as Executive Editor at Nature Publishing Group, which was one of ORCID’s founding organizations. I immediately became a champion because I saw ORCID as a wonderful collaborative community initiative that tackles a central question for researchers and scholars: getting due credit for their work. Credit is central to academic success and yet the infrastructure to provide credit is suboptimal. 

As an editor I also knew how hard it can be to identify potential reviewers with common names, and I had spoken to many researchers who, having changed their name at some point in their career, were worried about their bibliographic record turning up incomplete.  

I knew ORCID was addressing an important problem and I liked the principles of openness and researcher control that they baked in at the beginning. ORCID is also a demonstration of how multi-stakeholder, cross-industry collaborations can work. I have volunteered in various capacities over the years to help the organization succeed in its mission and since 2017 I have served as Chair of the ORCID Board of Directors. 

And what about PLOS and ORCID - when, why, and how have you been engaging with us?

PLOS is a long-time member of ORCID. We first offered authors the option to enter ORCID iDs in the Editorial Manager submission system in 2013. We added ORCID sign-in in 2014, and in 2016 became one of the first publishers to sign the open letter committing to implement ORCID according to their best practices for publishers across our entire portfolio. Later that year, we began requiring ORCID for all corresponding authors at initial submission.

Last week, we were very excited to extend ORCID to our peer reviewers as well. PLOS will automatically update the ORCID record for reviewers who give permission, confirming that the individual has completed a review. 

Reviewers deserve credit and recognition for the work they do in assessing and improving manuscripts--but this activity has so far been mostly kept behind the scenes. At PLOS we use single-blind review as a standard, but allow reviewers to sign their peer review comments if they wish. Last month, PLOS started offering authors the option to publish the peer review history of their manuscript alongside their published article. If the peer reviewers have chosen to sign their comments, their names will appear in the published peer review history. We see this as one step towards elevating peer review to a scholarly output in its own right. 

For various reasons, however, many reviewers prefer to remain anonymous. The ORCID integration allows all reviewers to get credit for performing reviews regardless of their preference about revealing their names, or the authors’ preference about publishing reviews. Thanks to the new ORCID integration, researchers can now keep track of their peer review contributions, establish a profile (which is especially important for early career researchers), and receive some much-deserved credit for their work.

What impact has ORCID had in your community?

We require ORCID for corresponding authors as part of submission. When authors give us permission, we automatically update their ORCID record with their newly published article. This allows authors to treat their ORCID record as an authoritative professional record, which can then be used to update university web pages, fill out grant applications, and more. 

We also encourage coauthors to link their ORCID iD to their account so they can have the same benefits as corresponding authors. We have adapted our online display so ORCID iDs are linked to each author name, alongside their affiliations and contributions through the CrediT taxonomy terms. There are now over 185,000 ORCIDs registered in our submission system.

Anecdotally we’ve had some very enthusiastic feedback from authors who use ORCID, especially after the article is published. 

What more can we do to improve our support for you and your community? 

ORCID is increasingly present in many systems that researchers use, but the experience of using your ORCID iD on different platforms can vary, and is not always as seamless as it could be. I think it would be helpful if ORCID could work with various stakeholders and system providers to create seamless optimized experiences for researchers. We want ORCID to feel easy and efficient for the researchers who rely on it. Assuming researchers provide permission, we should be able to take needed information from ORCID records without researchers having to fill out forms!

Another request that I often hear from researchers is to have easier ways to populate their ORCID record with their previous publications. A mid-career researcher may have dozens of publications and works that predate ORCID, and gathering all these publications in their official record can be time consuming.

What's your favorite ORCID success story?

My favorite success story is still in the making: the ORBIT project. Led by major funders, this initiative aims to allow researchers to use ORCID records to facilitate the completion of grant applications and grant reports. I like it because, when completed, this project will be a great demonstration of the benefits of ORCID in the full loop of the research cycle. By linking their ORCID iD to their publication, researchers can automatically have their ORCID record updated, and then by using ORCID to fill in their grant reports, this in turn decreases the administrative burden. 

On a more personal note, I also love that ORCID has provided a solution for the many researchers who have changed their name at some point in their career. Changing one’s name is a deeply personal decision, yet I know many researchers for whom this decision is also influenced by what will happen to their bibliographic record. Before ORCID, changing your name meant that half of your career would disappear from online searches. ORCID provides a solution to that, and I’ve seen several smiles and grateful emails when I’ve proposed this as a solution to someone with this dilemma. 

Which three words best sum up ORCID for you?

Trust, efficiency, and, increasingly, credit.

 

  Blog

ORCID and Funder Workflows - An Update

Thu, 27 Jun 2019 - 00:00 UTC

This post was co-authored with Brian Armour (CC Technology), James Lovell (Wellcome Trust), Jamie McKee (Altum), Ken Middleton (NIHR), and Brian Yim Lim (Wellcome Trust)

Over the past 18 months, the ORCID ORBIT project has been working with the funding community to ensure researchers and funders get the maximum benefit from ORCID during the funding application process.  The project started with a survey of data requirements and an assessment of process pain points. Next, the project launched a number of pathfinder projects. We are now pleased to share an update on some of the exciting integrations developed during the project.

Altum’s ProposalCENTRAL

Altum’s grant management/tracking system, proposalCENTRAL, is used by over 100 research funding organizations.  At the project start, Altum already had a basic ORCID integration, available to all funding organizations using their platform. During 2018, 17 of those funders required iDs from their researchers as part of the grant application process and 12 requested them. Twenty-three of the funders using the proposalCENTRAL are now requiring iDs, and 47% of all grant applicants on the platform have an iD. During the ORBIT project, Altum implemented additional workflows to further support both funders and researchers during grant application and reporting.

Researchers can now pull all their ORCID data (publications, awards, degrees, affiliations) into their proposalCENTRAL profile, and use this data in their Applications and Progress Reports by selecting from a list rather than re-typing. proposalCENTRAL also uses ORCID to help funders stay connected to their researchers’ accomplishments after a grant ends, and to use ORCID data to evaluate the impact of programs long after individual grants have ended. Together, these improvements save researchers time and provide funders with accurate work metadata to help them during the application process, progress reporting, and impact assessment as shown, for example, in the dashboards below.

 

Importantly, proposalCENTRAL also posts information about awarded grants back to the ORCID records of the awardees.  This allows the researcher to get recognition for their grants, as well as enabling them to share this information with other organizations and individuals. For example, these funding records can be associated with future publications, making it possible to automatically track outputs associated with grants.  

Wellcome Trust, NIHR, and CC Grant Tracker

Wellcome and NIHR have been long-time supporters of ORCID, with Wellcome being one of the ORCID launch partners back in 2016.  Both are signatories of the ORCID funder open letter (NIHR via UKRI), and both use CC Grant Tracker, a grant management platform from CC Technology. For the past five years, these organizations have used CC Grant Tracker’s ORCID integration to make it mandatory for Lead applicants to use an authenticated ORCID iD. Through the ORBIT project, which CC Technology is also participating in, all three parties have collaborated  to reduce the burden on applicants and also improve metadata quality to support reporting and integration.

Until last month, researchers applying for funding through CC Grant Tracker had to provide publication information by typing it directly into a textbox on the application form. More often, they copied and pasted from a list of their publications they kept elsewhere, formatting that list specifically to each funder’s specifications. This could be a tedious and time-consuming task for applicants (especially if they didn’t have a research assistant to do it for them!). It impacted funders as well, resulting in inconsistent formatting that made applications hard to read. The multiple ways that researchers can cite publications also created inconsistent metadata, hindering analysis. Inconsistent methods of providing research outputs were getting in the way of answering questions such as whether there is a relationship between where a researcher publishes and the success of their grant application.

In April 2019 CC Grant Tracker was updated with a new, improved ORCID integration. Wellcome have now gone live with the changes, and NIHR plan to do so shortly.  Now, when a researcher completes an application form, they can import publication information that they have previously connected to their ORCID record directly into CC Grant Tracker. Formatting is done automatically to the funder’s specification; applicants no longer need to spend time doing this themselves. This ensures consistency across application forms, making them easier to read for grants advisors, committee members, or anyone reviewing the application.

But that’s not all – researchers can also give permission for data about their successful applications to be added to their ORCID record. When a grant is awarded, the lead applicant’s ORCID record is automatically populated by CC Grant Tracker with details of the grant. Crucially, as this assertion is made by the funder (in this case Wellcome or, soon, NIHR) – and this assertion is explicit – anyone who views that ORCID record can be certain that the grant information was added by the funder themselves, not a third party.

Learn more

For more information about ORCID in funding workflows, please visit our funder web pages and funding submission systems workflow documentation -- and look out for information about several upcoming webinars about the use of ORCID by funders, featuring speakers from Altum, CC Technology, and ORCID funding organization members.

Related blog posts:   Blog

And the Lucky Winner Is...!

Wed, 26 Jun 2019 - 00:00 UTC

As part of our 2019 Year of the Researcher celebrations, we invited researchers to tell us why they would like to join us for our annual ORCID staff retreat. Out of an excellent candidate pool we are delighted to announce that Dr Andre Leon S Gradvohl (pictured), a professor at the School of Technology at the University of Campinas, and ad hoc consultant in the Brazil Ministry of Education and São Paulo State Council of Education, will be joining our team for a day. 

In his application, Andre told us: “I have known ORCID for some time. In fact, well before my institution joined ORCID. At that time I was looking for a way to concentrate all the information about my intellectual production, including papers in scientific journals or conferences, and data repositories, in a single place. Since then, ORCID has been very useful for me, especially in recent times with the integration with some data repositories (Zenodo in particular), as well as other bibliographic databases that automatically update my ORCID registry. In particular, I like two ORCID features. The first is the possibility of having a reliable repository on the web that concentrates all the information about my academic life, my intellectual production - including other productions besides the papers - as well as prizes, affiliations and projects funding, among others. Another feature I really like is the automatic update of the Registry. This saves us time and, in parallel, provides reliable information from an authorized source.”

As well as spending time with the whole ORCID team, Andre will also be interviewed by our UX Designer, Mallory Robertson, as part of our ongoing efforts to improve the ORCID user experience; and by the communications team, to help us craft more effective messaging for researchers.

While all the applications we received were of a high quality, three others in addition to Andre’s really stood out: Dr Paula Carina Araujo (Universidade Federal do Paraná, Brazil), Dr Lasith Gunawardena (University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka), and PhD candidate, Emma McGrath (University of Dublin, Trinity College, Ireland; and Notre Dame University, USA). 

One of our questions for applicants was what they liked most about ORCID. Lasith responded that:“My first name and, especially, surname are rather common in Sri Lanka and there are others in diverse fields, including some who have more illustrious research profiles. [ORCID] helps me stand out and be uniquely identified without ambiguity ... One of the features which I highly desire and often refer during these presentations the ability to re-use information stored in the ORCID profile in other platforms.” 

Emma’s response was: “I like the idea [of ORCID] because science involves a global community and we only progress as a society through collective knowledge. Consolidating the contributions of individual researchers through a single platform is vital as a step in removing barriers to information and connecting scientists and organizations.”

We also asked what applicants like least about ORCID, and Paula told us that, although she believes ORCID is “part of a new paradigm in scholarly communication,” she would “suggest some improvement on the data visualization on ORCID ... in the Works section, for example, it would be better if the user could see the different types of works separately.” Great feedback, which have added to our new public User Feedback Trello board.

And, of course, we asked everyone why they wanted to join us at our staff retreat: what they hoped to get out of the day, and what they would contribute to it. Here are a few of the responses:

  • “I want to understand if such tools [as ORCID] are useful for my students who will not continue to be involved with research but as professionals will be "consumers" of research.” (Vanessa Yingling, California State University - East Bay, USA)
  • “I would love to have an inside look at how those who work with ORCID everyday talk about it. Because I talk about it so regularly in my work I would really appreciate more language and knowledge from experts. Help me learn to convince others to not only set it up but also use it in innovative ways.” (Kortney Rupp, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA)
  • And, in the words of our winner: “I strongly believe in ORCID's potential as a trusted and universal repository for academic records. Therefore, I think I can contribute to the discussion about the features that ORCID implements now and other features that you can implement in the future."

Our thanks to all who participated for your interest and support. We are looking forward to our Day with a Researcher!

 

Blog

Last call for 2020 ORCID Board Recommendations

Tue, 25 Jun 2019 - 00:00 UTC

This is such an exciting time in the evolution of ORCID! With well over 1,000 members and more than 6.5 million users, ORCID expects to reach financial break-even this year. We’re therefore at a pivotal moment, when the organisation needs to move out of its start-up phase and into a mode where it can run as a self-sustaining, mature operation while losing none of the creative spark and innovative DNA that have characterised its first seven years.

This is a point, then, where it’s more important than ever that the ORCID Board provides the guidance needed to ensure that ORCID continues to make strong progress towards achieving its mission. It's also important that the Board is as representative as possible of the ORCID community, and this is why the Board elections process is so critical. The Nominations Committee needs to select a slate of candidates that is balanced and diverse, taking into account different sectors, regions and skills, as well as the non-profit status requirements as established in the ORCID bylaws.

This year we would be particularly interested to hear from candidates who have expertise in the areas of research policy and management, finance, or risk management (with legal, privacy, identity, and/or security focus). We would like to maintain the strong representation that we have in the Asia-Pacific region, to strengthen our representation from Africa and mainland Europe, and to secure excellent candidates from Latin America. Our aim is to maintain a diverse group of people and viewpoints.

The Board meets three times a year so you will need to ensure that you can be available to travel to in-person meetings. There is financial support available to those for whom this could prove a barrier via our new Board Meeting Attendance Fund. The deadline for applications is 1 August 2019, and you can find more information about the Nominating Committee, the timetable and process, and Board member responsibilities on our Elections web page.

The application process is straightforward and the experience of serving on the ORCID Board is both exciting and extremely rewarding. You will have a real opportunity to influence the future direction of this important organisation, to help realise our vision of a world in which everyone who participates in research, scholarship, and innovation is uniquely identified and connected with their works and affiliations across disciplines, borders, and time. So please do consider joining us!

We look forward to hearing from you, and please contact me if you have any questions.

  Blog